Myles Boch, playing Bernard, second from right, speaks to Debbie Cable Brown, playing Suzette, right, Ellen Faltermann, playing Suzanne, second from left, and Evan Clawson, playing Robert, during a rehearsal of "Don't Dress for Dinner" at the Temple Civic Theater on Tuesday, May 13, 2014. Mi…

Ellen Faltermann, playing Suzanne, center, talks with Myles Boch, playing Bernard, while keeping Evan Clawson, playing Robert, in the background during a rehearsal of "Don't Dress for Dinner" at the Temple Civic Theater on Tuesday, May 13, 2014. Michael Miller/Telegram

Myles Boch, playing Bernard, front, and Evan Clawson, playing Robert, wrestle over a phone during a rehearsal of "Don't Dress for Dinner" at the Temple Civic Theater on Tuesday, May 13, 2014. Michael Miller/Telegram

Ellen Faltermann, playing Suzanne, and Myles Boch, playing Bernard, interact during a rehearsal of "Don't Dress for Dinner" at the Temple Civic Theater on Tuesday, May 13, 2014. Michael Miller/Telegram

Lincoln Durham’s cross-generational geniality must have roots in his musical start. His father and grandfather taught him to fiddle at age four. He took to it well, winning the Texas State Youth Fiddle Championship at age 10. 

Durham switched to electric guitar as a teen and studied Jimi Hendrix and Stevie Ray Vaughn. He nailed those two styles, added them to his toolbox and kept moving forward.

His dark lyrics and gothic anime music videos will attract some, repel others, of any age; but his instrumental and vocal skills are inarguable. 

He’s sort of a Johnny Depp-meets-Deep Ellum. Like Depp, he has vastly different looks: cute boy-next-door, cowboy, hipster, professor. Then there’s this diabolical publicity photo that almost smells sulfuric. 

His blues guitar is authentic and skillful. You can hear Blind Lemon Jefferson, Muddy Waters, T-Bone Walker and Lead Belly in his music. Like a true Southerner, there are a lot of biblical references. It could be the essence of Blind Willie Johnson, if his use of gospel themes wasn’t so wayward. In any case, this music is powerful. 

He plays just about anything, including a diddly bow, which is a cigar box stuck on a broom handle with a piano string tied on. There aren’t any other instruments except his voice and his foot beating time. Making good music is not a struggle for Durham. Just bend the tap and it flows out. 

The Temple Symphony Orchestra Season Finale Concert will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Mary Alice Marshall Performing Arts Center at Temple College. The program includes “Finlandia, Op. 26” by Jean Sibelius; “Violin Concerto in D minor, Op. 47” by Jean Sibelius, featuring Eka Gogichashvili, violinist, and “Symphony No. 3 in E flat major Eroica, Op. 55” by Ludwig van Beethoven.

Dr. Eka Gogichashvili is associate professor of violin at Baylor University. 

Musical Director and Conductor Thomas Fairlie has chosen romantic pieces from Beethoven and Finnish composer Jean Sibelius.